Program

 

The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children — is a health and nutrition program with a successful record of improving the diet of infants, children, and pregnant, postpartum and breastfeeding women who are at risk for nutrition-related illness. The main focus of WIC is educating mothers about proper nutrition for babies and young children.

 

WIC’s annual conference, the Texas WIC Nutrition & Breastfeeding Conference promotes best practices in the field and provides continuing education. Among the nearly 600 WIC community members who attend the conference, are representatives from the WIC state agency, as well as administrators and staff from local WIC agencies and clinics across Texas.

 

Schedule at a Glance

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Handouts

 

Wednesday, June 21st

8:00 am - 11:30 am (Pre-Conference)

An Analysis of Racial Inequities: Understanding How We Got Here & What We Can Do to Improve

Pre-Conference Workshop
Joyce James, LMSW-AP | Joyce James Consulting

In the absence of a racial equity lens, well-meaning professionals unconsciously contribute to sustaining and often perpetuating racial inequities, both in the design and in the delivery of programs and services. This workshop will enhance participant’s awareness of institutional and structural factors that are often overlooked, create a liberated space for engaging in new conversations that result in a common language and understanding of the underlying factors that contribute to racial inequity. Interactive exercise will be used to examine the “Box”-like thinking that hinders ability to work effectively as a team and /or to view work through a racial equity lens. This increased knowledge can be a catalyst for increased capacity of participants towards a common vision to implement strategies for sustainable improvements that benefit the target population and improves outcomes for all.

 

Creating a Culture of Excellence: The Leader's Role

Pre-Conference Workshop
Michael Daggs | Tutt & Daggs

The research is clear: engaged, committed leaders are more productive, more efficient, and inspire others to follow. They simply move their organizations forward! This presentation will focus on leadership commitment and developing skills that will improve driving employee commitment towards excellence as a leader. The importance of one-on-one conversations with employees in regards to re-recruiting high performers, coaching middle performers towards higher performance, and moving low performers up or out of the organization will be discussed. This session will look at how the best leaders use recognition to motivate their employees, retain the best talent, and encourage repeatable positive performance. As a result, attendees will begin to create a tool kit of ideas and proven best practices in the area of reward and recognition. This fun and interactive session will equip each leader to play an active role in creating a culture where excellence is the expectation.

 

Embracing Change for a Brighter Future

Pre-Conference Workshop
Gloria Staats, MS | Texas Department of State Health Services

In this session, attendees will identify how they respond to change and how their response affects others, describe the phases of change, and identify characteristics of each phase. Those who attend will develop strategies for assisting others through change and identify five ways to increase personal resilience and develop an action plan to implement what was learned to enhance leadership effectiveness. (This is not a Quality Management session.)

 

1:00 pm - 2:15 pm

Texas WIC - Building a Brighter Future

Welcoming Remarks

 

2:15 pm - 3:00 pm

TXIN...The Future is Now!

Welcoming Remarks
Candace Stohs-Krause | Texas Department of State Health Services
Karen Clements | Texas Department of State Health Services

The TXIN pilot agencies go live in just over a month! At this session, we'll give you a preview of some of the most exciting new features, including reporting, growth charts, inventory management, and scheduling.

 

In addition, you can stop by the TXIN booth in the exhibit hall to see a demonstration of both a clinic workflow in TXIN and a brief demo of the new Service Desk system, and talk to TXIN team members and vendors about your burning questions.

 

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Ensuring a Brighter Future: A Fresh Look at Weighty Issues

Opening Keynote
Barb Bancroft, RN, MSN, PNP | CPP Associates, Inc.

This presentation provides a "fresh look" at weight issues -- as well as pearls that can be applied to clinical practice immediately. What are some of the myths and mysteries of weight loss? Are there gender differences? How does sleep affect weight gain or weight loss? Is there a "best time of day" to eat the biggest meal of the day? Should you sleep in a cold room? How does your biological clock play a role in weight gain or loss? What is the number one food that causes weight gain? Join Barb for a fun, fascinating, and educational look at weighty issues...

 

Objective:

  • Discuss some of the common myths/mysteries of weight loss.
  • Describe the influence of the biological clock influence on weight gain and weight loss.
  • Discuss the influence of the microbiome on weight gain and weight loss.

 

 

Thursday, June 22nd

8:30 am - 10:00 am

In the Milk: New Research Data on Marijuana & Other Drugs

Breastfeeding
Thomas Hale, PhD | InfantRisk Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Do you know all the active and inactive forms of marijuana? How does marijuana transfer into milk of breastfeeding mothers? What are the risks associated with marijuana exposure? This session will cover new research data on marijuana as well as other drugs of abuse, and describe the transfer into human milk. You will learn how to evaluate the relative risk of marijuana exposure in breastfeeding mothers, as well as the problems associated with chronic exposure to marijuana products and implications in pregnancy.

 

Objectives:

  • Describe the transfer and what we presently know about marijuana in human milk.
  • Evaluate the relative risk of marijuana exposure in breastfeeding mothers.
  • Evaluate the problems associated with chronic exposure to marijuana products in breastfeeding mothers.

 

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Determinants of the Infant Gut Microbiome and Childhood Obesity

Nutrition
Noel Mueller, PhD, MPH | Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Humans acquire a rich microbial ecosystem from their mothers during natural labor. Deterministic of this microbial acquisition are myriad factors, including maternal health, use of antibiotics, diet and lifestyle during pregnancy, and, perhaps most strongly, delivery mode. In addition to shaping newborn microbial acquisition, these perinatal factors, particularly delivery mode, are associated with the future risk for the offspring in developing modern metabolic diseases such as obesity. As such, seeding the newborn with the “right” microbes at birth holds the potential for primordial disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life course. This session will motivate the importance of mother-to-newborn transmission of microbiota for prevention of metabolic diseases, highlight recent original research, and put forward a research agenda in this arena.

 

Objectives:

  • Determinants of the Infant Gut Microbiome and Childhood Obesity
  • Describe the importance of the maternal microbiome for development of the infant microbiome.
  • Demonstrate how interruptions to the maternal-offspring transmission of microbiota may alter offspring metabolism.

 

Latest Research & Efforts to Promote Latino Childhood Obesity Prevention

Nutrition
Rosalie Aguilar, MS | Salud America! - UT Health Science Center at San Antonio

Latino kids face a number of environmental barriers that promote inequities and propagate disparities in childhood obesity. Nearly 40% of Latino children today are overweight or obese compared to only 29% of non-Latino white children. Among Latino toddlers, the situation is even more dire with 30% of children ages 2-5 years at risk of being obese. Coordinated campaigns and collaborative efforts across all sectors are necessary to have broader, sustainable impact. Nutrition education combined with policy can combat the epidemic. How can advocates get involved with promoting changes in their community? This session will discuss ways to create a “culture of health” in one’s own organization, community and sphere of influence. The role of early childcare centers, schools and community organizations will also be discussed.

 

Rich vs. Poor, Native Born vs. Immigrant, Mother vs. Mother: A History of Wet Nursing in the U.S.

Breastfeeding
Jacqueline Wolf, PhD | Ohio University - Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Social Medicine

For every 100 infants born in 1900, 13 died before their first birthday, usually from diarrhea caused by spoiled, adulterated cows’ milk. Thus, when a wealthy woman was unable or unwilling to breastfeed, she hired a wet nurse to ensure her child’s survival. Wet nurses were invariably single, impoverished, desperate young women, forced by the wealthy mothers who hired them to place their own babies in foundling homes where infants were fed artificially and the death rate approached 100%. This talk tells the story of those wet nurses and their employers. The institution of wet nursing in the United States, by its very nature, meant that a poor baby died so a wealthy baby could live. Lessons learned from this history that are applicable to infant care, motherhood, and breastfeeding today will be discussed.

 

Objectives:

  • Explain why the institution of wet nursing existed in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Describe the social and cultural impact of wet nursing.
  • Apply the lessons learned from the history of wet nursing to infant care, motherhood, and breastfeeding today.

 

Father's Role in Family Wellbeing

Clinic Services

Kaeley Bobbitt, PhD | The University of Texas at Austin, Child and Family Research Partnership

Fathers have a substantial impact on the well-being of their children and their child’s mother. This session details the ways in which fathers are involved in their family’s lives and the effects of father involvement (or lack of involvement) on child and family well-being, and describes policies and programs that aim to enhance a father’s positive influence on his family.

 

Using Design Thinking to Innovate WIC

Skills Building
Hildreth England, RD, LD | Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Open Agriculture (OpenAg)

In the Fall of 2017, the MIT Media Lab, the design firm IDEO, and the former Assistant Surgeon General of the United States Dr. Susan J. Blumenthal will host a summit at MIT to explore how to use design & technology to radically modernize and improve the experience and public health outcomes of the WIC program. It will be a "working conference," facilitated by IDEO designers, who will lead MIT researchers, public health experts, WIC experts (including WIC clients), and private sector collaborators through an exploratory brainstorm - using a methodology called Design Thinking - to envision what WIC could look like in 5, 10, and 50 years.

 

In this Texas WIC NEBF session, participants will get an overview of the insights IDEO and MIT have prepared so far, learn the basic principles of human-centered design and Design Thinking (and then get the chance to practice!), and then lend their voices to the conversation that will happen at MIT in the fall. The session will be led by Hildreth England, former Texas WIC Engagement Specialist, Assistant Director of the OpenAg Initiative at the MIT Media Lab, and Program Director for the summit.

 

 

1:30 pm - 3:00 pm

Creating Brighter Futures for Women & Children:
The Impact of Maternal Health Before, During & After Pregnancy

Nutrition
Helene Kent, MPH, RDN | HM Kent Consulting

A woman’s reproductive well-being matters for her health and the health of her infant. This session will integrate current nutrition science, epidemiological data, public health theory and practical advice about how women’s health affects infant mortality and mortality. Current information about the impact of pregravid weight and other factors will be reviewed. Strategies and tools to continue making a positive difference in WIC will be shared.

 

Infectious Disease and Its Transfer Via Human Milk

Breastfeeding
Thomas Hale, PhD | InfantRisk Center, Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center

Breastfeeding in mothers suffering from various infectious diseases is problematic and is not always clear. Most infectious agents, while present in human milk, may not actually be transmitted via milk. With most infections, mothers may continue to breastfeeding. This lecture will outline those situations where mother may or may not be able to continue breastfeeding.

 

Objectives:

  • Describe the implications of breastfeeding with various viral and bacterial diseases.
  • Evaluate the relative risk of developing infectious syndromes from maternal milk, as well as individual risks with each of numerous infectious syndromes.
  • Evaluate the problems associated with evaluating medication use in various types of breastfeeding mothers.

 

Innovations in Municipal Anti-Human Trafficking Responses and
Increased Victim Identification in Public Healthcare Settings

Public Health
Minal Patel Davis, JD, MBA | City of Houston

This session will discuss the City of Houston’s overall approach as laid out in its anti-human trafficking strategic plan. Attendees will learn indicators of human trafficking, evidence to support that trafficking victims often go unidentified in public healthcare settings, and how to use screening tools to increase victim identification. Information will be given for proper referrals for comprehensive case management, whether it be individualized, medical/psychiatric, or psychological.

 

Red Flags in Infants and Children

Clinic Services
Sara Gibson, MD | The University of Texas at Austin - Dell Medical School Pediatric Residency Program
Jordan Reis, MD | The University of Texas at Austin - Dell Medical School Pediatric Residency Program

Sometimes "Dr. Google" can make identifying a rash more complicated (and scary!) than necessary. During this session the speakers will review common clinical symptoms and complaints that children may present with at your office. Speakers will help you recognize when a complaint is likely benign versus potentially dangerous. This session will specifically address common skin, respiratory, cardiac, and gastrointestinal findings that one should recognize as a "red flag," prompting timely referral to a healthcare provider. 

 

Objectives:

  • Distinguish between normal newborn skin findings verses alarming skin changes that warrant further workup.
  • Recognize clinical signs and symptoms concerning for child abuse.
  • Identify clinical signs of dehydration and when common complaints (i.e. vomiting, diarrhea) are unusual and potentially dangerous.
  • Recognize clinical signs and sounds associated with respiratory distress in newborns and children.

 

Driving Employee Engagement: The Leader's #1 Priority

Skills Building
Michael Daggs | Tutt & Daggs

The focus of this session will be on three keys that will improve how leaders relate and communicate with the people who are tasked with following them. First, leaders must understand the importance of identifying their high, middle and low performers. Leaders will learn the importance of one-on-one conversations with each employee in regards to re-recruiting high performers, coaching middle performers towards high performance, and moving low performers up or out of the organization. Second, the importance of leader rounding and how doing it correctly impacts the culture of the organization will be discussed. Finally, the importance of teamwork and managing up employees will connect the dots to driving employee engagement to the highest level.

 

 

3:30 pm - 5:00 pm

Determinants of the Infant Gut Microbiome and Childhood Obesity (REPEAT)

Nutrition
Noel Mueller, PhD, MPH | Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Humans acquire a rich microbial ecosystem from their mothers during natural labor. Deterministic of this microbial acquisition are myriad factors, including maternal health, use of antibiotics, diet and lifestyle during pregnancy, and, perhaps most strongly, delivery mode. In addition to shaping newborn microbial acquisition, these perinatal factors, particularly delivery mode, are associated with the future risk for the offspring in developing modern metabolic diseases such as obesity. As such, seeding the newborn with the “right” microbes at birth holds the potential for primordial disease prevention and health promotion throughout the life course. This session will motivate the importance of mother-to-newborn transmission of microbiota for prevention of metabolic diseases, highlight recent original research, and put forward a research agenda in this arena.

 

Objectives:

  • Describe the importance of the maternal microbiome for development of the infant microbiome.
  • Demonstrate how interruptions to the maternal-offspring transmission of microbiota may alter offspring metabolism.

 

Rich vs. Poor, Native Born vs. Immigrant, Mother vs. Mother:
A History of Wet Nursing in the U.S. (REPEAT)

Breastfeeding
Jacqueline Wolf, PhD | Ohio University - Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Social Medicine

For every 100 infants born in 1900, 13 died before their first birthday, usually from diarrhea caused by spoiled, adulterated cows’ milk. Thus, when a wealthy woman was unable or unwilling to breastfeed, she hired a wet nurse to ensure her child’s survival. Wet nurses were invariably single, impoverished, desperate young women, forced by the wealthy mothers who hired them to place their own babies in foundling homes where infants were fed artificially and the death rate approached 100%. This talk tells the story of those wet nurses and their employers. The institution of wet nursing in the United States, by its very nature, meant that a poor baby died so a wealthy baby could live. Lessons learned from this history that are applicable to infant care, motherhood, and breastfeeding today will be discussed.

 

Objectives:

  • Explain why the institution of wet nursing existed in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Describe the social and cultural impact of wet nursing. Apply the lessons learned from the history of wet nursing to infant care, motherhood, and breastfeeding today.

 

Why Women Lose Their Milk: The Time-Sensitive Nature of Early Milk Production

Breastfeeding
Barbara Wilson-Clay, BSEd, IBCLC, FILCA | BreastfeedingMaterials.com

Concerns about low milk supply and excessive early infant weight loss are among the most frequently cited reasons women abandon exclusive breastfeeding. While a lack of information about normal breastfeeding sometimes contributes to the perception of low supply, in many cases the problem is real. A number of well-documented factors may cause a delayed onset of milk production and contribute to low milk production. These include long, stressful labor, cesarean delivery, maternal weight or obesity, metabolic or hormonal disorders, maternal blood loss or infection, and poor early stimulation by a preterm, small, injured or ill infant. What are the best practices to protect the option to breastfeed in such cases? New research provides interventions that can help mothers maximize their milk production, and emphasize the critical nature of the timing of these interventions.

 

Objectives:

  • Identify causes of delayed onset of milk production and acquired low milk supply.
  • Identify early infant weight loss as a predictor of early supplementation and early weaning.
  • Discuss the time-sensitive nature of interventions to protect milk production, including new research on calibration of milk production.

 

Scarcity: The Impact on Decision Making

Clinic Services
Joyce James, LMSW-AP | Joyce James Consulting

Scarcity creates a distinct psychology for everyone struggling to manage with less than they need. For example, busy people fail to manage their time efficiently for the same reasons the poor and those maxed out on credit cards fail to manage their money. The more we understand the dynamics of Scarcity and how it works on the human mind, the more likely we are to find ways to avoid the “Scarcity Trap” that plays a major role in trapping individuals and organizations, such that neither achieve the desired outcomes. Under WIC’s goal of providing client-centered education, the session seeks to arm attendees with information to help WIC clients learn new skills, retain new information, or achieve goals. WIC clients cannot be ready to learn new skills (such as breastfeeding or healthy cooking) if their most basic needs are not being met. Scarcity is more than just not having enough and in fact Scarcity changes how we think. At the conclusion of the session, attendees will understand how thinking in terms of Scarcity provides a sharper more realistic focus that leads both individuals and organizations to greater success.

 

Helping WIC Families: A Holistic Clinic Approach to Intimate Partner Violence

Skills Building
Krista Del Gallo | Texas Council on Family Violence

This workshop will provide participants with an overview of how the presence of Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) among WIC families may diminish or result in negative outcomes relating to pregnancy and maternal and child health. We’ll explore utilizing a universal information approach to promote awareness, safety and resiliency among all WIC families, including strategies for discussing IPV with patients and providing effective tools and referrals.

 

 

Friday, June 23rd

8:30 am - 10:00 am


How to Be a Grande Extra-hot, No-whip Triple Espresso in a Short, Non-fat Vanilla Latte Extra-whip World

Closing Keynote
Pam McCarthy, MS, RD | Pam McCarthy Associates

Ever feel invisible and powerless in this world? Do you see people you want to connect with, but don't know how? Do you wish you had a job that allowed you to bravely change lives? The good news is you get to choose if you want to be a jolt of happy caffeine or a drizzle of bland fluff in life. In this session, you'll learn the difference between giving people what they need and what they want. You'll practice jumping the "invisible wall" that allows you to see clients in a different way. And you'll discover simple ways to become a powerful person in the lives of others.

 

 

10:30 am - 12:00 pm

Recognizing WIC's Bright Stars

Awards & Closing Remarks